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TaylorMade Not Resting On Its M1, M2 Laurels

By John Steinbreder – Global Golf Post

M2-17_DRV_MacroIn the fall of 2015, TaylorMade introduced its M1 driver, and not long after that the Carlsbad, Calif., equipment maker brought out a slightly different model, dubbed M2. Both clubs sold well and built strong followings in the competitive and recreational realms. That did not stop company officials from looking at ways to improve on those products. At this week’s PGA Merchandise Show in Orlando, Fla., they were to roll out new iterations of each one.

The M1 utilizes 43 percent more carbon composite than its predecessor, thanks to a lower density titanium alloy called 9-1-1, and a carbon toe panel. In addition, the two-tone crown incorporates a six-layer carbon composite panel that is fit to the skeletal titanium body using a proprietary process that improves manufacturing consistency.

M1-17_DRV_BeautyAccording to TaylorMade engineers, those advances also allowed them to save weight and then design a longer and more aerodynamic movable weight system on the sole. They also were able to lower the center of gravity to make the clubface faster and more forgiving.

As for the new M2, it employs what the company calls a “geocoustic” design that combines geometry and acoustical engineering – and is made to produce more forgiveness as it improves sound. The geometry portion of that technology is found in the sunken sole of the driver, which also uses 9-1-1 titanium to free up volume and enable the engineers to make the driver’s head and face larger, so it looks more forgiving and performs that way, too.

At the same time, the sunken sole works with sound ribs to dampen vibrations at contact and enhance sound. And the weight savings from those and other features allows the company to relocate discretionary mass low and back in the sole, for improved distance and forgiveness.

The new M1 driver comes in two models, a 440 cc version with a more compact head and deeper face, and one 460 cc in size. Both feature a new 4-degree, ultra-
lightweight loft sleeve. With regards to the M2, it is offered in a regular version and also one with a draw bias, called D-Type. Each of those heads is 460 cc.

Republished with permission by Global Golf Post.